(bis heute stehen 450 klimarelevante wissenschaftliche Artikel zur Verfügung)

Buch GLOBAL CHANGE: Enough water for all? (english)

Editors: José L. Lozán, Hartmut Graßl, Peter Hupfer, Ludwig Karbe & Christian-Dietrich Schönwiese

List of the authors

List of the institutions


Chapters

1.  ESSENTIAL FOR LIFE – water in view of natural sciences

2. WATER USE AND HUMAN IMPACTS ON THE WATER BUDGET

3. WATER AND CLIMATE CHANGE

3.1 CHANGES IN THE WATER CYCLE

3.2 POSSIBLE CONSEQUENCES

4. WHAT SHOULD BE DONE?


Chapter 1: ESSENTIAL FOR LIFE – Water in view of natural sciences

1.1  Water as basis of life (J. L. Lozán, S. Meyer & L. Karbe)
1.2 The physicochemical properties of water and their relevance for life (B. C. Gordalla, M. B. Müller & F. Frimmel)
1.3 Hydrological cycle and water balance –  A global survey (J. Marcinek)
1.4 The concept of water in everyday and public discourse (U. Haß)
1.5 Ocean and cryosphere and their effects on the global water budget and the climate (P. Hupfer &. A. Helbig)
1.6 Distribution and transport of water in the atmosphere (M. Quante)
1.7 Mountain glaciers and water supply (H. Escher-Vetter)
1.8 Mountain glaciers and water supply (M. M. Tilzer)
1.9 Fossil and young groundwater as components of the hydrological cycle (C. Kohfahl, G. Massmann & A. Pekdeger)
1.10 Water balance of forested catchments (V. Goldberg & C. Bernhofer)
1.11 Water and its use in early history (H. Fahlbusch)
1.12 Water disasters: A historical review (M. Börngen)

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CHAPTER 2. WATER USE AND HUMAN IMPACTS ON THE WATER BUDGET

2.1 Surface waters under stress factors and their controlling by integrated measures (R. Koschel, H. Behrendt & M. Hupfer)
2.2 Water demand and water consumption of private households and the industrial sector by countries (U. Scheele & S. Malz)
2.3 Water demand in agriculture (F.-M. Chmielewski)
2.4 Water as a means of transport (H. Heyer & A. Schmidt)
2.5 The aesthetics and acceptability of purified water (H. H. Dieter & R. Schmidt)
2.6 Irrigation water use – A global perspective (S. Siebert & P. Döll)
2.7 The importance of reservoirs for water supply and power generation – An overview (F. Nestmann & C. Stelzer)
2.8 State and pollution of freshwater ecosystems – Warning signals of a changing environment (M. Hupfer & A. Kleeberg)
2.9 Salinisation of inland waters (H. Zimmermann-Timm)
2.10 Groundwater salinisation (S. Martens & K. Wichmann)
2.11 What will be the future of the Aral Sea? (S.-W. Breckle & W. Wucherer)
2.12 Which adverse effect or »xenochemicals« contaminate or endanger preferentially the drinking-water? (H. H. Dieter)
2.13 Formation, utilization and management of water resources in Germany (K. D. Aurada)
2.14 Hygiene requirements for recreational water (Coastal and freshwater, swimming pools and spas) (I. Feuerpfeil & J. M. Lopez-Pila)
2.15 Drinking water quality: Requirements claimed by national and international standards (H. Bartel)
2.16 Chemical contaminats of concern for drinking water (H. Fawell)
2.17 Dams – structures and functions – on a global scale (K. Aurada & R. Rödel)

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3. WATER AND CLIMATE CHANGE

3.1 CHANGES IN THE WATER CYCLE

3.1.1 Global water cycle and climate change – Interactions  (S. J. Lorenz, D. Kasang & G. Lohmann)
3.1.2 The global precipitation pattern and its changes in the 20th century (L. Jaeger)
3.1.3 Intensification of the hydrological cycle – An important signal of climate change (D. Jacob & S. Hagemann)
3.1.4 Groundwater and climate change (S. Vassolo)
3.1.5 Changing river discharges (A. Bronstert & H. Engel)
3.1.6 Variability of European precipitation within industrial time (Chr.-D. Schönwiese & S. Trömel)
3.1.7 Precipitation trends and shifts of rainfall regimes in Africa since 1951 (G. Malitz, Ch. Beck & J. Grieser)
3.1.8 Mediterranean rainfall changes and their causes (J. Jacobeit, A. Dünkeloh & E. Hertig)
3.1.9 Precipitation trends and shifts of rainfall regimes in Africa in the period 1951–2000 (Ch. Beck)
3.1.10 Brandenburg: A region in Germany suffering from water deficit – In spite of its numerous lakes (M. Stock & W. Lahmer)
3.1.11 Future projections of water use in Europe – Findings from an ensemble analysis (M. Flörke, I. Berlund & J. Alcamo)
3.1.12 Caspian Sea level fluctuations as a consequence of regional climatic change (G. N. Panin)
3.1.13 Change of regional extremes (D. Kasang)
3.1.14 Sea level rise and hydrological problems of coastal zones (M. Schirmer, B. Schuchardt & H. Sterr)
3.1.15 Assessment of global scale water stress indicators (Martina Flörke & Joseph Alcamo)

3.2 POSSIBLE CONSEQUENCES

3.2.1 Accelerated desertification (R. Baumhauer)
3.2.2 Biodiversity and desertification (M. Akhtar-Schuster & U. Schmiedel)
3.2.3 The significance of climate change for water-related diseases (Th. Kistemann, Chr. Höser, A. Wieland & M. Exner)
3.2.4 Climate-related effects on water quality (Th. Blenckner)
3.2.5 Water scarcity and violent conflict (Chr. Fröhlich)
3.2.6 The emerging conflict of using Nile water for irrigation purposes, especially between Egypt and Ethiopia, due to the disturbance of the reliability of the arrival of the Monsoon season as triggered by European/Asian brown cloud  (H.-J. Luhmann) (siehe auch unten: weitere relevante Artikel)*
3.2.7 Present and future problems of water in developing countries (F. Brugger)
3.2.8 Global change and extreme hydrological conditions – Floods and droughts (L. Menzel & Z. Kundzewicz)
3.2.9 Irrigation induced soil salinisation in the Yanqi Basin, China-modelling approaches and possible solutions (P. Brunner, Xinguang Dong, Wenpeng Li & W. Kinzelbach)
3.2.10 Potential impacts of water scarcity on the world economy (S. Peterson & G. Klepper)
3.2.11 Flood disasters and climate change: Trends and options – A (re-)insurer’s view (W. Kron & G. Berz).

*Other related publications to Chapter 3.2.6:
http://www.swp-berlin.org/fileadmin/contents/products/aktuell/2013A11_lsw.pdf
http://www.spiegel.de/politik/ausland/streit-um-nilwasser-aegypten-droht-aethiopien-indirekt-mit-krieg-a-905373.html

CHAPTER 4. WHAT SHOULD BE DONE?

4.1 Measures for climate protection (H. Graßl)
4.2 Desalination of seawater (S. Lattemann)
4.3 Water saving: Measures, concepts and technologies in the urban, industrial and in the agricultural sector (U. Scheele & S. Malz)
4.4 Two examples towards the efficient and sustainable management of scarce water resources in North-west and West Africa (M. Christoph, P. Speth, M. Bollig, J. Burkhardt, B. Diekkrüger, G. Menz, M. Rössler & W. Schug)
4.5 Sustainable water management in urban areas (P. A. Wilderer)
4.6 Ecological sanitation: Innovative sanitation systems for urban and peri-urban areas, high- and low-tech options with resources recovery (R. Otterpohl & M. Oldenburg)
4.7 More food with less water: The role of efficiency gains, lifestyles, and trade (H. Lotze-Campen & M. Welp)
4.8 Responsible water use – The example of BASF AG Ludwigshafen (Erich Völker, Gerhard Zimmer & Bernd Elendt-Schneider)
4.9 Elements of care in water management – Gender dimensions for sustainable water use (B. Knothe)
4.10 Water conserving plants for agriculture in arid and semi-arid areas (S. Breckle & M. Küppers)
4.11 Evolution and milestones of global freshwater policy (B. Pilardeaux)
4.12 Water related conflicts – And the need for a global water strategy (U. E. Simonis)
4.13 Water – Public good or trade commodity? (K. Lanz)
4.14 10 years of Water Framework Directive (K. Pinz)
4.15 Where are we concerning the human right to water and sanitation? (I. Winkler)
4.16 Privatisation: Key to the solution of the global water crises? (I. Spiller)
4.17 How do we guarantee the human right: Sufficient water for all? (R. Bär & F. Kürschner-Pelkmann)
4.18 The privatisation of water services in Germany and selected countries (H.-W. Krüger)
4.19 Experience with the privatisation of water sectors in England and Bolivia with remarks about other countries (Frank Kürschner-Pelkmann, Klaus Lanz & José Lozán)